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  1. #1
    I wonder what is the longest early 70's disco song?



    The longest ones I know of are:



    Creative Source - Who Is He & What Is He To You 1973 (11:44)



    Isaac Hayes - Persuit Of The Pimpmobile 1974 (9:07)



    Temptations - Papa Was A Rolling Stone 1972 (11:47) (More so a funk song than disco but I'll include it anyway)



    Deodato - Super Strut 1974 (9:31)



    They are the longest ones I know of, does anyone know of any longer early 70's disco songs?

  2. #2
    Love To Love You Baby - Donna Summer (16:48)



    Try Me, I Know We Can Make It - Donna Summer

    (17:57)



    I can't think of any other songs that is

    longer than these. My mother said that in

    the discotheques, the D.Js would extend

    Try Me to the max. So instead of 17 minutes,

    you may be dancing for 20min- a half an hour.



    DELIGHTFUL!

  3. #3
    If you include both sides of Romeo and Juliet, then I would think that would be the one of the longest disco compositions (perhaps 30 minutes).

  4. #4
    Funky Dude,

    Once I've seen the "Longest Disco Song Post"

    then I realized that I made a mistake posting

    in the "early" list. Otherwise, I can't think

    of any "Early Long Disco Songs".



    DELIGHTFUL!

  5. #5
    I remember that "here comes that sound again"

    was over 16 minutes long.

  6. #6

    On 2001-11-09 21:17, GROOVYGUCCIMAMA wrote:

    I remember that "here comes that sound again"

    was over 16 minutes long.


    Hey GROOVYGUCCIMAMA, I was wondering what was the name of the artist who sings "Here Comes That Sound Again" and which year did it came out?

  7. #7
    Hello everybody:



    Here Comes That Sound is from Love De Luxe and, as far as I remember it was released in 1979 (maybe 1980).



    I can't really remember how long these following songs are, but probably they are bigger than those you mentioned:



    CERRONE:

    supernature



    SANTA ESMERALDA:

    the wages of sin (their best work)

    the house of the rising sun

    don't let me be misunderstood

    (all 3 occupy the whole A side)



    EL COCO

    cocomotion



    Bye

    Paulo

  8. #8
    Hi Funky



    Forgive my previous post. I also didn't see the word EARLY long disco song.



    Paulo

  9. #9
    Just out of interest, did anyone of the former DJs on this board ever generally play more than 5 minutes of any one song?
    I personally feel that the producers went wrong when they started to extend intros beyond 24 bars, or possibly 32 bars.
    Hmmm, now where are those 12"s with the 3 minute intros?

  10. #10
    nrgbeat's Avatar
    nrgbeat is offline Platinum Record [Level 8]
    I always thought the Top 40 oriented clubs played only a few minutes of each song and mixed out at the first break, however the underground clubs seemed to play the songs longer.

  11. #11
    NrgBeat: Very interesting. You'd have thought that it would be the other way around.After all, there's only so many hits, so why not spread 'em out?
    In the UK it was common for jocks to play virtually the whole 12" (out of sheer laziness!!) 'cos mixing was not really done by the mass of DJs in the Disco era.
    Personally, 3-4 minutes was enough of most records for me. That way I could play all the hits plus all the new records I wanted to play too.

  12. #12
    If the record was a hit I could 'work'that record and the floor for ten minutes easy, I had two copies of every hit song, in a good nite when I was inspired, I would remix my own version right there live, I only wish now I had all those tapes. Oh well, who knew.

  13. #13
    NickNack is offline Double Platinum Record [Level 9]
    To Quinny: Yes, all the time. Had no problem with it at all. AAMOF, I refused to chop all the songs up just because of length AND I hated the way a lot of dj's were mixing out on the breaks, probably the strongest part of the song.

    To FunkyDude: "Get Ready", Rare Earth, 21:30, from 1969. A "live" take on The Temptations hit but workable up to the drummer's solo.

    _________________
    If It Don't Mean a Thing, Would You Dance to My Music
    Nicky

    <font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: NickNack on 2002-09-04 20:19 ]</font>

  14. #14
    ashley is offline Underground Hit [Level 5]

    Re: Longest early 70's disco song?

    .. sadly UK djs had it all wrong .. but for the right reasons .. the UK has a strong club culture .. most urban teenagers in the UK find themselves in a nightclub every weekend .. a long tradition going back to the 1950s ( and probably earlier ) .. so UK djs needed to keep the popular hits spinning .. and quickly, as back in the 70s all clubs would close at 2.00am .. so there was no requirement for a long extended dance mix .. The USA was very different .. clubs were open all night, the crowds were more discerning, djs needed to create differing moods throughout the night, as well as visit the bathroom occasionally .. everyone whooped, whistled, stomped and cheered when a good disco break was used .. so US djs would use 2 copies and extend the breaks, or extend the introductions and create their own remixes using different instrumental breaks over & into each other .. creating long soundscapes that were far beyond the understanding of a casual UK club audience .. so in the USA clever & imaginative club djs took on almost legendary status ( Tony Humphries / Larry Levan etc .. ) .. UK clubbers & djs were baffled by these 20 minute LP disco tracks emerging from America .. which is probably why Alec R Costandinos & Boris Midney had very limited success in British nightclubs ..

  15. #15

    Re: Longest early 70's disco song?

    Quote Originally Written by ashley View Post
    .. sadly UK djs had it all wrong .. but for the right reasons .. the UK has a strong club culture .. most urban teenagers in the UK find themselves in a nightclub every weekend .. a long tradition going back to the 1950s ( and probably earlier ) .. so UK djs needed to keep the popular hits spinning .. and quickly, as back in the 70s all clubs would close at 2.00am .. so there was no requirement for a long extended dance mix ..
    Important point Ashley.
    That UK club culture was important and SO strong and it also illustrates the difference between the commercial discos who were playing the hits and the upfront serious UK clubbers who's knowledge and passion still resounds to this day. So a commercial jobbing DJ would have to play what the punters wanted, while a serious DJ would take the crowd on a journey.

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