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  1. #76

    Re: Disco 1000

    "The purpose of this is to bring back memories and introduce tracks to the ever-growing number of younger Dance Music enthusiasts who are keen to discover the music which has influenced so much of today's - in my opinion - inferior sounds!" - so yes, the kids seem to be a target here, like they should. I adore Ritchie Family tunes from 1977 but wouldn't dream of spinning them to clubbers today. An Adolf Stern disco track from 1977 or anything by JP Massiera from the same year, those will go down like a bomb.

  2. #77
    SanDee's Avatar
    SanDee is offline Double Platinum Record [Level 9]

    Re: Disco 1000

    Apologies Jussi, I didn't read the thread fully. I suppose it's important to spread the message to youngsters as they are our future as Whitney & George told us! However, the people with the money tend to be the older section of the population. Maybe the 'club kids' are going to develop into the future movers & shakers who run companies who could possibly influence public taste, who knows? (I'm just trying to see the bigger picture.)
    They Only Come Out At Night.......
    My heart is in the cause of the uncommon man.

  3. #78

    Re: Disco 1000

    Quote Originally Written by JussiK View Post
    Would club kids today be dancing to that kind of 70's disco, any of the tracks posted so far? American Generation, The Nolans, The Jammers, the expected Studio 54-style classics ad infinitum? If they do somewhere, great. In my experience they go for a totally different sound. 70's Disco yes but not like that.
    A lot of parties & club nights play what I'd call soul, 80's boogie and two step as opposed to real disco. I DJ'd at a prty where the brief was 'Underground 70's disco'. So played AKB BAnd, Montana, Mike Theodore etc...the crowd did not enjoy it but when I played Musique, Saturday Night Band, Francine McGee, Karen Young, etc. etc. all up & dancing - it was a younger crowd too. Rather then the Nolans I'd like to being DJing and then drop Roxy Music - Love Is The Drug!
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  4. #79

    Re: Disco 1000

    Quote Originally Written by JussiK View Post
    "The purpose of this is to bring back memories and introduce tracks to the ever-growing number of younger Dance Music enthusiasts who are keen to discover the music which has influenced so much of today's - in my opinion - inferior sounds!" - so yes, the kids seem to be a target here, like they should. I adore Ritchie Family tunes from 1977 but wouldn't dream of spinning them to clubbers today. An Adolf Stern disco track from 1977 or anything by JP Massiera from the same year, those will go down like a bomb.
    Hi Jussi, maybe I didn't express myself as well as I could have done. When I put my list together I was looking for songs that were either extremely popular in the discos, sprinkled with a few mainstream tunes - no Nolans thankfully! - plus a few others that all but the most ardent of disco lovers may have long since forgotten. It is mainly targeted at people of my age group (see below) or older because I felt they would be the ones who would most appreciate it.
    However, having read a number of other threads on this site it was clear that it wasn't totally being visited by 40/50 somethings like myself and that some younger people were checking in, to such an extent that they were requesting tips on what tunes from the distant past they should be listening out for. Songs that to me are like the staple diet of disco fans - Gino Soccio's "Dancer" for example - was introduced to one youngster by a regular contributor to this site and they were totally knocked out by it. What I am trying to say is, here guys is a list of tunes which you ought to check out. You might love them, you might hate them, but give them a try.

    As for me I love most of 'em but not all. Some I actually dislike but to omit them from the list or give them a low placing would be churlish. I hate "Ring My Bell" with a passion but I had to include it at the high end of the chart (top 60) because so many people out there like it. I'm no DJ (and I'm getting on a bit - fetch me my zimmer nurse!) - and I haven't a clue which 70s/80s tunes would go down well today with the youth on the dancefloor - but I'd be really interested to know which ones would! Shame they wouldn't go for Johnny Hammond, Gregg Diamond, Cut Glass or Cloud One though.
    PIR is a way of life

  5. #80

    Re: Disco 1000

    ITA with you Dunc. There are early-disco 45s and album tracks that I only discovered by buying them in the 80s and even 90s and they absolutely delighted me. Even certain kinds of old disco-band records are starting to get me kind of open though at first listen I might actually say as a policy I'd prefer something in the more stylized disco-mix vein. [Thanks, Danny Boy!] A short list of such follows, as always:

    Brothers and Sisters - Rita Fortune
    Follow the Brightest Star - Voyage
    Somebody's Gotta Go (Sho' Ain't Me)- Mike and Bill
    Let's Go All the Way (Down) - Brenda & the Tabulations



    As to your last point, Dunc, with experience, I now understand the subtext of what I saw on dancefloors like the Saint, Paradise Garage, Fun House, Reflections and even Boybar or Heaven, and why certain songs just fit the crowd and became their quintessential tracks. Every generation will have their own.
    skiddly bop doo wow! (Billy Paul) Wake up and live! (Debbie Allen) Ommmm...(Me)
    Bow-chick-a-bow, chick-a-bow-wow-wow!(Hugh Roy)
    Pray like it's all up to God, work like it's all up to you.
    The only people you need to get even with are the ones who helped you.(Patti LaBelle)
    When life hands you lemons, marinate the chicken.(Anne Burrell)

  6. #81

    Re: Disco 1000

    Quote Originally Written by Funkin Dunc View Post
    I haven't a clue which 70s/80s tunes would go down well today with the youth on the dancefloor - but I'd be really interested to know which ones would!
    There's djs like Loud E, Malory&Zoopsie, SpAceLex, Albion, Mystic Rock, Carlo Simula and Emil Doesn't Drive who play it around Europe and Japan. I've been spinning disco for club kids for quite a few years now, Barcelona, London, Paris, Berlin etc. The scene started with sounds like the Automat album, synth soundscapes born from I Feel Love and From Here To Eterinity. The music is called space disco or cosmic disco and it incorporates stuff from rhythmic prog records from the 70s, anything with a spaced out feel. Then, acoustic elements were introduced and a new sound was "born", called beach/hippie disco. This has to do with sitars, bongos, cheap synths and a dancing-barefoot-on-beach feel. Then there's the basic eurodisco end of the spectrum, not meaning concept albums by Cerrone, Costandinos or the Chantareau/Dahain/Voyage team, but small label one non-hit wonders with flanging drums, off key singing and heavy doses of weirdness - the key word in fact - , often from Italy. The peak year for this stuff was 1977.

    the number one in-demand disco record right now is this:

    Rendez Vous: My Blue Bird


    This one pretty much defines the sound with the synth, the 60's style singing and the girl chorus.

    A lot of the stuff is downtempo and very druggy while as many go for a real fast tempo, stuff called bangers. Many are afro- or eastern flavoured and very melodic, not just heavy rhythm & synths. This one's quite enduring:

    Eyes: Black Caravan


    And finally there's the disco from strange & exotic locations like the former DDR, Bulgaria, Nigeria, plus the Bollywood school of disco. And porno soundtracks and library disco records. Also, we spin borderline loungey material such as this peerless package holiday tune reeking of excess aftershave:

    Peret - Xavi (360 en torno a Peret)


    - so, a kind of beginner's guide to what I was talking about? :-) Disco that's not American, not well produced, technically so-so but addictive and with a lot of energy. A bit like punk ?zone flyer.jpg
    Last edited by Bernie; May 6th, 2012 at 02:22 PM. Reason: added artist and song title to each video embed

  7. #82

    Re: Disco 1000

    Plus, let's not forget just how old and obscure the repertoire selection was in big contemporary hit singles like "Tainted Love"and "Rockafella Skank" in the Eighties and Nineties. Even more obscure -- to the general public -- than "Sun is Shining" and "A Little More Conversation." "Disco's Revenge," "Bamboogie," "Salsoul Nugget" "The Bomb!" and "I know You Want Me" were hardly based on excerpts from famous mainstream records -- maybe you could say Pitbull's was, to the extent that Bucketheads charted. Or Fatman Scoop, ditto Rob Base.
    skiddly bop doo wow! (Billy Paul) Wake up and live! (Debbie Allen) Ommmm...(Me)
    Bow-chick-a-bow, chick-a-bow-wow-wow!(Hugh Roy)
    Pray like it's all up to God, work like it's all up to you.
    The only people you need to get even with are the ones who helped you.(Patti LaBelle)
    When life hands you lemons, marinate the chicken.(Anne Burrell)

  8. #83
    SanDee's Avatar
    SanDee is offline Double Platinum Record [Level 9]

    Re: Disco 1000

    Quote Originally Written by skiddlybop View Post
    Plus, let's not forget just how old and obscure the repertoire selection was in big contemporary hit singles like "Tainted Love"and "Rockafella Skank" in the Eighties and Nineties.

    It's interesting that you should select 'Tainted Love' skiddly because as you probably know the original version was a big hit on the 'Northern Soul' scene, and when Jussi first described this 'space disco' scene I commented at the time that it reminded me so much of the NS scene with it's love for very obscure & slightly rough-round-the-edges records from a bygone era.
    They Only Come Out At Night.......
    My heart is in the cause of the uncommon man.

  9. #84

    Re: Disco 1000

    Quote Originally Written by SandraDee View Post
    ... when Jussi first described this 'space disco' scene I commented at the time that it reminded me so much of the NS scene with it's love for very obscure & slightly rough-round-the-edges records from a bygone era.
    I think there are a lot of parallels, particularly the fetishization of obscurity where the rarer, the better. I think a big part of the appeal for both scenes was that the records aren't just something anyone can go out and buy or download. Whether or not that's a good thing is a matter of opinion, I suppose. I have to roll my eyes at all the "Most Influential Dance Tracks" that include Frankie Wilson's "“Do I Love You (Indeed I Do)": how can a record which literally nobody heard for years be musically influential? It was certainly influential in defining the NS soul scene, since the impossible rarity of it (there are, what, three known copies of the original pressing?) made it completely unattainable and thus vaulted it to legendary status. But as a musical work, I'm not so sure. Would anyone have cared about that record if it was your typical thrift store find?

    I have very mixed feelings about the obscurity-as-heavenly ethos. On one hand, I do quite enjoy a lot of these "cosmic disco" tracks and their charmingly lo-tech production. I am very much in favour of always digging deeper, and rediscovering what was looked over so long ago, and applying that to the context of today. That which is weird, dark, and uncommercial is always worth exploring.

    But on the other hand, for most of these records, there's little wonder as to why they are so obscure in the first place. Many of them were failed attempts to imitate more successful records, but that isn't always apparent in today's context. Some are delightfully weird, some are more interesting than good, and some are just... bad. Now we have all this strange historical revisionism. Take the original Bernard Fevre/Black Devil Disco Club album. I read comments from people who praise it as being so brilliant and original and ahead of its time... but to me, it's blindingly obvious that it's a wonky, low-budget knock-off of Giorgio Moroder's From Here To Eternity. The pitch-bending string synths, the sequencers, the processed vocals, all derived from FHTE. Now, back when that record came out, it took a lot of money to produce music like that. It required bleeding-edge technology to pull that off (ironically, today it's so easy that you can do it on an iPad). Something as simple as synchronizing two different sequencers was a major feat of engineering. Fevre didn't have access to that, so he came up with some cost-effective shortcuts. No hugely expensive vocoder? Run the vocals through a ring modulator instead. Drum sounds? Just use a tape loop of real drums. And so on. In terms of quality, it borders on laughable... but if you can look beyond that, it's interesting in its own right.

    Thing is, back then that didn't impress anyone. That record didn't sell because FHTE already existed. Who would buy a pale imitation when they could have the real thing instead? Now, Disco Club also has a much darker sound and some very twisted lyrics (or so it seems, it's impossible to make them out), but that kind of thing scares off more people than it attracts. I quite enjoy Disco Club, but it could only sound original and forward-thinking if you've never heard FHTE. But is it better than FHTE? Well, that's all down to personal opinion. I still enjoy good production values though.

    Getting back to more general stuff... I'm not sure if I would even consider much of the cosmic stuff to be disco at all. To me, the lush sound, lavish production, and general over-the-top decadence is the most defining part of what disco is all about. Something like the cosmic scene is what you get into after you've already played out all the big and medium and minor hits. It's where to start looking once you think you've heard it all. Much like obscure prog or krautrock, it's not so much that they're great records but that they're interesting ones. Definitely fun for those who like to explore hidden or long-lost worlds of music, but as examples I would use to describe disco to someone who knows nothing of it? Well, probably not.

    In short, I can't help but to think that some records are being elevated to greatness because of rarity/obscurity, which is just as wrong to me as doing the same because of popularity.

  10. #85

    Re: Disco 1000

    In short, I can't help but to think that some records are being elevated to greatness because of rarity/obscurity, which is just as wrong to me as doing the same because of popularity.[/QUOTE]

    I agree. There are good records from the space disco genre, which I have to admit I would not know about if it wasn't for Jussi, and there are those I hear and I think, "what is all the fuss about?". On the flipside, that exists with better known artists as well. Where I live it IS radical to be playing Giorgio Moroder instead of LMAO, in terms of my age group that is. Ironically if I was playing a different style of music, yet equally old, such as ACDC or Cold Chisel (shudder), I would be given a lot more compliments than I get now (and people do comment on it, sometimes favourably, more often not). I wasn't lucky enough to experience that stuff first time around so it is new to me in that sense. I would like to think the two worlds can mix with each other and that we can enjoy songs from all spectres of the disco genre. At least that is how I approach this music.
    Last edited by boogienights; May 6th, 2012 at 10:18 PM.
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  11. #86

    Re: Disco 1000

    Bruno you're right of course. Still, the records unearthed are not anything less than brilliant in most cases. If it wasn't for the obsessive and yes elitist digger mentality those sounds would be lost forever. And the kids absolutely do love the music, it's not just a quirky fad for them. You'll get many rushing up to ask the titles, and then madly checking Discoqs, Ebay etc for avaibility. So, the elitism is justified, and it's great to come up with something hard-to-get and brilliant :-)

    Some of this stuff is indeed cheap ripoffs of then-current hits, failures that in the long run turned out more interesting than their role models. Like you say not necessarily better in the traditional sense when listened at home but definitely more interesting on the dance floor. Louder synths, weirder arrangements, more energy. Still, a Blue Bird is nothing like any hit of it's era, it's a true original. That is what it's all about, something completely out of the ordinary that is wonderful to dance to. - Myself, I tend to get carried away with all the excitement and throw down some pretty questionable tracks too, only for the headstrong. I'm too far gone and past sensible thinking already concerning this stuff. Still, I get booked a lot.

    The tunes are not for all tastes naturally. I don't promote the music to my regular daytime friends etc. The wife, the friends and the fellow workers have been giving me enough strange looks like "remember when we used to get some jazz funk here or quality disco stuff?". But it's the fact that it's happening in clubs right now that matters. Mixed together, these records become a molecule-re-arranging revelation (?) nolla.jpg
    Last edited by JussiK; May 7th, 2012 at 03:50 AM. Reason: my spelling is terrible

  12. #87

    Re: Disco 1000

    Wow Jussi, I feel like I'm getting a complete re-education. Hopefully I will be the richer for it, stuff like this would have passed me by.
    Sadly, I'm now going back to my original thread and Cosmic Disco it ain't. Instead it's Isle-Of-Wight's Brit Funkateers, later reincarnated as FM radio darlings, who will fill the no. 989 slot.
    Also coming soon... a diva extraordinaire not noted for disco; a much-loved Canadian disco star; and three different teacks by one of disco's most loved orchestral acts from back in the day.
    PIR is a way of life

  13. #88

    Re: Disco 1000

    #989 STARCHILD - LEVEL 42
    Back when Level 42 were considered 'Jazz-Funk' and were the darlings of the Ford Cortina brigade they produced this excellent track. Signed to the Polydor label in the UK this video contains a promo version which was previously unknown to me, and quicker in tempo than the single and LP versions - but no worse for it.

    Most Brit-Funk at the time was pretty substandard compared to the US stuff it was trying to emulate although the energy shown by some of the UK acts gave it a kind of charm of its own. Level 42 were some of the most gifted musicians of the UK scene, most notably Mark King on bass.
    PIR is a way of life

  14. #89
    SanDee's Avatar
    SanDee is offline Double Platinum Record [Level 9]

    Re: Disco 1000

    Quote Originally Written by Funkin Dunc View Post
    Sadly, I'm now going back to my original thread and Cosmic Disco it ain't.
    You carry on FD, the stuff you're listing is no less relevant just 'cos 'trendy' kids don't like it.
    They Only Come Out At Night.......
    My heart is in the cause of the uncommon man.

  15. #90
    SanDee's Avatar
    SanDee is offline Double Platinum Record [Level 9]

    Re: Disco 1000

    Quote Originally Written by BrunoRepublic View Post
    Take the original Bernard Fevre/Black Devil Disco Club album. I read comments from people who praise it as being so brilliant and original and ahead of its time... but to me, it's blindingly obvious that it's a wonky, low-budget knock-off of Giorgio Moroder's From Here To Eternity.

    It's so nice to hear you say that 'cos I really dislike it. I first heard the Black Devil stuff on the 'Baia Degli Angeli 77-78' cd; I'm quite partial to some 'dark' dance music myself but I just found this stuff unpleasant & ugly, in the same way that I find alot of rock music & modern hip-hop to be.
    They Only Come Out At Night.......
    My heart is in the cause of the uncommon man.

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