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Thread: Charts: Billboard Top 100 vs Cashbox Top 100

  1. #1

    Charts: Billboard Top 100 vs Cashbox Top 100

    I don't know if this is the right section to post this, so my apologies if I've got it in the wrong section.

    While doing some research into 70's music for a playlist, I discovered a site that contains the Cashbox magazine charts from the mid-1940's to 1996. Having always based my musical 'selections' on what's on the Billboard charts, can anyone tell me if there was any difference between what was on Billboard vs Cashbox? Which was the more respected chart service in the industry? Was one more valued than the other? And why did Cashbox cease publication?

  2. #2

    Re: Charts: Billboard Top 100 vs Cashbox Top 100

    Billboard was more revered I guess and taken more seriously than Cash Box (after all, the American Top 40 was based on Billboard's chart).

    Cash Box and Billboard's charts could be similar at times, and not-so-similar at other times. During the '70s, a lot of songs made the CB charts that did not appear in BB's. Also, many songs that placed high on BB didn't chart the same way on CB.
    "Everyone knows the real reason why you got that part it was the time you spent on that casting couch"--Antoine Merriwether
    "Excuse me, Miss Thing, but both of us spent time on that couch"--Blaine Edwards

  3. #3

    Re: Charts: Billboard Top 100 vs Cashbox Top 100

    Hi Bob, what is the URL of the Cashbox charts site please?

  4. #4
    rhessel's Avatar
    rhessel is offline Underground Hit [Level 5]

    Re: Charts: Billboard Top 100 vs Cashbox Top 100

    Quote Originally Written by disco-disc View Post
    Hi Bob, what is the URL of the Cashbox charts site please?
    Hi disco-disc:

    Before the Cdnbob answer I googled it and find the website.

    Try here:

    Cash Box Top Singles

    Hope it helps.

    Cheers,

    Hessel
    Cheers,
    Hessel
    :icon_razz: :icon_biggrin: :icon_razz: :icon_biggrin:

  5. #5
    markydefad's Avatar
    markydefad is offline Triple Platinum Record [Level 10]

    Re: Charts: Billboard Top 100 vs Cashbox Top 100

    Hmmmm...that's interesting. Must spend some time checking out their pop charts. Thanks for the tip.
    "Lost inside adorable illusion...."

  6. #6

    Re: Charts: Billboard Top 100 vs Cashbox Top 100

    Quote Originally Written by rhessel View Post
    Hi disco-disc:

    Before the Cdnbob answer I googled it and find the website.

    Try here:

    Cash Box Top Singles

    Hope it helps.

    Cheers,

    Hessel
    Yup, that's the site. Its been interesting reading I can say that.

  7. #7

    Re: Charts: Billboard Top 100 vs Cashbox Top 100

    For the most part, Cashbox (to the best of my amateur chart-freak understanding) represented the best-selling 45s in the nation, while Billboard's Hot 100 was always a mixture of radio play and record sales.

    From looking at the #1 hits in the '70s on Cashbox, you'll see many, many Billboard #1's and many other Billboard top 5's. Rarely, though, you'll get an exception like this: Cashbox has "Run Joey Run" (tragic teenage tale) hitting No. 1 in October '75, whereby its highest ranking in Billboard was only a "measly" #10.

    When Record World and Cashbox and Billboard all had competitive record industry trade magazines, an oft-quoted rallying cry was "It Ain't No. 1 'til it's No. 1 in Billboard". As the other 2 ceased publication over the years, Billboard certainly reinforced its authority in the music biz.

    However, from a collecting standpoint, Cashbox and Record World always had cooler covers, as they would typically use up the entire cover with a pic of a popular artist of the day. Billboard's covers generally resembled a newspaper with columns upon columns and little pics here and there.

  8. #8

    Re: Charts: Billboard Top 100 vs Cashbox Top 100

    at the Cashbox site... I thought I read somewhere that they include jukebox plays as well.

  9. #9

    Re: Charts: Billboard Top 100 vs Cashbox Top 100

    "Run Joey Run" peaked at #4 on Billboard's Hot 100 chart on October 4, 1975.

    I've always felt that Billboard's Hot 100 chart was erratic in the mid-'70s; a song was #1 one week and the following week fell out of the Top 10, and would be off the chart in two-to-three weeks. Same for records in the top ten, especially from late 1974-late 1975. It wasn't until the summer of 1976 that records started having a longer shelf life, and the length of #1's increased (Rod Stewart's "Tonight's The Night" eight-week run at #1 in late 1976 was the longest stay at #1 on the Hot 100 since Gilbert O'Sullivan's "Alone Again (Naturally)" in 1972).
    "Everyone knows the real reason why you got that part it was the time you spent on that casting couch"--Antoine Merriwether
    "Excuse me, Miss Thing, but both of us spent time on that couch"--Blaine Edwards

  10. #10

    Re: Charts: Billboard Top 100 vs Cashbox Top 100

    Thanks for the link and info. guys....will check it out...
    What are people's views about Record World Charts then ?...they had a Disco File column and Top 20 written by Vince Aletti, who was quite in the know regarding DJ plays BITD.
    I think Marky is going to review in his Billboard Consensus charts 1976 round up (Hope it is alright to 'Tease' Marky)

  11. #11

    Re: Charts: Billboard Top 100 vs Cashbox Top 100

    Quote Originally Written by Salsoul1975 View Post
    "Run Joey Run" peaked at #4 on Billboard's Hot 100 chart on October 4, 1975.

    I've always felt that Billboard's Hot 100 chart was erratic in the mid-'70s; a song was #1 one week and the following week fell out of the Top 10, and would be off the chart in two-to-three weeks. Same for records in the top ten, especially from late 1974-late 1975. It wasn't until the summer of 1976 that records started having a longer shelf life, and the length of #1's increased (Rod Stewart's "Tonight's The Night" eight-week run at #1 in late 1976 was the longest stay at #1 on the Hot 100 since Gilbert O'Sullivan's "Alone Again (Naturally)" in 1972).
    I thought that was interesting also... but if you look closer... some of those songs were in top 10 for 6 weeks or more.. lots of congestion in early '75.

  12. #12

    Re: Charts: Billboard Top 100 vs Cashbox Top 100

    Quote Originally Written by Salsoul1975 View Post
    I've always felt that Billboard's Hot 100 chart was erratic in the mid-'70s; a song was #1 one week and the following week fell out of the Top 10, and would be off the chart in two-to-three weeks. Same for records in the top ten, especially from late 1974-late 1975. It wasn't until the summer of 1976 that records started having a longer shelf life, and the length of #1's increased (Rod Stewart's "Tonight's The Night" eight-week run at #1 in late 1976 was the longest stay at #1 on the Hot 100 since Gilbert O'Sullivan's "Alone Again (Naturally)" in 1972).
    Ah but I noticed this kind of thing in the Cashbox charts from the 70's too. One case that sticks out is where a record by an artist I liked had peaked and was going back down the charts. One week it was like number 55 or so and then the next week it was gone. It seemed incredibly odd to me that a song could fall 45 or more points in one week and be off the chart so quickly. Mind you, I did read somewhere that Cashbox had been charged with chart fixing several times during its lifetime.

  13. #13

    Re: Charts: Billboard Top 100 vs Cashbox Top 100

    Quote Originally Written by efunk_adelic View Post
    at the Cashbox site... I thought I read somewhere that they include jukebox plays as well.
    Yes that's correct. It states that on the Cashbox chart site (see link above).

    Quote Originally Written by drlove View Post
    When Record World and Cashbox and Billboard all had competitive record industry trade magazines...
    Hmmmm... I wonder if there are any Record World charts on the net?

    Actually the whole concept of a top 40 or top 100 chart in today's world is almost redundant I would think what with people going the download route, whether legally or illegally, and the concept of the cd and AM/FM radio format dying.

  14. #14

    Re: Charts: Billboard Top 100 vs Cashbox Top 100

    thanks, Salsoul1975, for the correct Billboard charting stat for Run, Joey, Run !!! For Halloween 5 years ago, my friend Shannon & I "acted" out the song's story line, and we even added a Julie "ascending" to heaven flourish towards the end !!! Oh, the things you do when you adore 70s music, even the truly, truly bad songs of that decade:icon_twisted:

  15. #15

    Re: Charts: Billboard Top 100 vs Cashbox Top 100

     

     

     

    Quote Originally Written by efunk_adelic View Post
    I thought that was interesting also... but if you look closer... some of those songs were in top 10 for 6 weeks or more.. lots of congestion in early '75.
    If you think their Hot 100 chart was congested in early 1975, the Soul chart was even more congested. In 1975, there were 42 number one songs, which probably had set a record. On the Hot 100, there were 35 number ones, tying 1974's tally. On the Hot 100 from January 11 to April 5, 1975, each week had a new number one song and the top five didn't contain a hodgepodge of new songs. Interestingly enough, during the latter part of the year the length of number ones had increased; "Bad Blood" by Neil Sedaka, "Island Girl" by Elton John and "Fly, Robin, Fly" by Silver Convention all spent three weeks at the top; "Fame" by David Bowie and "That's The Way (I Like It)" by K.C. & The Sunshine Band spent two weeks at #1 (nonconsecutively). "I'm Sorry" by John Denver and "Let's Do It Again" by The Staple Singers were the only songs during that time frame to spend a week at Number One. Plus, there were a plethora of Top 5 songs during the latter half as well: the aforementioned "Run, Joey Run", The Isley Brothers' "Fight The Power", "Miracles" by Jefferson Starship, "Calypso" by John Denver (b-side of "I'm Sorry"), "Ballroom Blitz" by Sweet, "Games People Play" by The Spinners, "Lyin' Eyes" by The Eagles, "Heat Wave" by Linda Ronstadt, "Who Loves You" by The Four Seasons, "The Way I Want To Touch You" by The Captain & Tennille and "Sky High" by Jigsaw.
    "Everyone knows the real reason why you got that part it was the time you spent on that casting couch"--Antoine Merriwether
    "Excuse me, Miss Thing, but both of us spent time on that couch"--Blaine Edwards

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